3
0
0

Laugh To Cure Motor Neurone Disease

Motor Neurone Disease has been hitting close to home in the tennis world - last year the ATP, this year the WTA. But with no known cause, effective treatment or cure, laughter can be the best medicine.

Published January 18, 2014 12:10

Laugh To Cure Motor Neurone Disease
Laugh To Cure Motor Neurone Disease

MELBOURNE, Australia - Last year, the tennis family lost Brad Drewett - the ATP World Tour's CEO - to Motor Neurone Disease. Now, the WTA's former Vice President of Player Relations and On Site Operations, Angie Cunningham, has been diagnosed with the disease and is trying to fight through it.

But with no known cause, effective treatment or cure, laughter can be the best medicine.

The Laugh To Cure Motor Neurone Disease campaign has been launched to not only raise awareness about the disease, but to raise money for research to help find a cure in a positive and uplifting way.

During this year's Australian Open, the tennis family will come together and bring you fun videos of the players showing special skills, singing a song or just telling a story about the funniest thing that ever happened to them during their career. The videos will all be posted on the campaign's official website, www.laughtocuremnd.com, and the funniest ones will also air on Channel 7's Happy Slam coverage.

Serena Williams, Victoria Azarenka, Maria Sharapova, Angelique Kerber, Ana Ivanovic, Samantha Stosur and Casey Dellacqua have already recorded messages of support and funny anecdotes.

You can donate right on the campaign's website - all funds raised will be donated to the Motor Neurone Disease Research Institute of Australia, with the goal of $100,000 to fund a new research study.

Motor Neurone Disease is a group of neurological diseases that affects the voluntary muscles in the body, which control activities like speaking, walking, swallowing and general movement. It progresses over time, causing debilitating disability and eventually death. The life expectancy is two to three years.

There's no known cause for the disease but there's a high occurrence in athletes. In the US the disease is also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, after the famous baseball player who died from it.

On Saturday night in Melbourne there was a special event hosted by Pat and Angie Cunningham at their home to launch the campaign, with a number of former WTA players in attendance - Janet Young, Rennae Stubbs, Alicia Molik, Barbara Schett and Nicole Pratt, and others from the tennis family like Paul Kilderry, Josh Eagle and Judy Murray. Also, Peter Johnston gave a speech on behalf of the WTA.

Share this page!

Related news

  • Insider Podcast: US Open Preview

    August 28, 2016
    WTA Insider | On the eve of the US Open, a lot is on the line in the final Grand Slam of the 2016 season; Pam Shriver joins the podcast to give her thoughts on the women's draw.
  • Mirza & Niculescu Claim New Haven Crown

    August 27, 2016
    Sania Mirza and Monica Niculescu capped off their newly rekindled doubles partnership with their first title together at the Connecticut Open, edging past Kateryna Bondarenko and Chuang Chia-Jung.
  • Radwanska Tops Svitolina In New Haven

    August 27, 2016
    Top seed Agnieszka Radwanska survived a late challenge from Elina Svitolina to claim her first Connecticut Open title and clinch the US Open Series.
To The Top
3