23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams zoomed into the US Open semifinals with a comprehensive quarterfinal victory over No.18 seed Wang Qiang.
WTA Staff
September 4, 2019

NEW YORK, NY, USA -- Six-time US Open champion Serena Williams of the United States exhibited a stunning display of form on Tuesday night as she overpowered No.18 seed Wang Qiang of China, 6-1, 6-0, to move into the semifinals of her home Grand Slam event for the 13th time in her legendary career.

No.8 seed Williams earned her 100th match-win at the US Open in her first time facing Wang, dispatching the Chinese No.1 after just 44 minutes of play, tying Simona Halep's third-round victory over Viktoria Kuzmova in Madrid for the shortest WTA match of the year.

"It feels good," Williams stated in her post-match press conference. "It feels like, okay, this is what I've been training for. This is how hard I've been working. It feels like, you know, hard work pays off when that happens."

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The American was in devastating form from start to finish, hitting 25 winners to just ten unforced errors, and she never faced a break point, having won 19 of 21 points on her first serve (90 percent).

"I'm okay to play a lot of matches in a row; I'm okay to play 44-minute matches," said Williams. "I think at this stage in my career I have so much experience of playing super-long matches and super-short matches, I'm pretty much ready for everything."

Wang, who upset World No.2 Ashleigh Barty in the previous round, was left unable to replicate that form by Williams's dominance. The World No.18 did not hit any winners during the clash and lost all five of the break points she faced.

"I've been working on my speed, getting shots," Williams said. "I didn't give [Wang] too many chances in the match."

Williams was immediately in overwhelming form, firing winners at will to hold in the opening game, then quickly breaking for 2-0 after a deft dropshot was followed up by a passing winner on break point. The American swiftly broke again for 4-0 as Wang was left reeling by Williams’s pinpoint aggressive play.

The American maneuvered to 5-0 and was two points away from the set at 0-30 in the next game before Wang steadied herself, extending the rallies and clinching a service hold to get on the board at 5-1. However, that did not send Williams off course, as she blasted a forehand winner, an error-forcing backhand, and an ace to reach triple set point in the next game.

Williams needed only one chance to attain the one-set lead after another fabulous forehand forced an error from Wang. Williams was nearly untouchable in the first set, winning 92 percent of points on her first serve, converting both of her two break points, and getting through all of her service games without facing a break point.

Williams’s level of play was just as imposing in the second stanza, as she collected 24 of the 28 points contested in that set en route to the bagel. The American held complete control from the start of the second set, as she fired a backhand crosscourt winner to break Wang at love in the first game. Williams continued to cruise, breaking Wang at love again to reach 3-0.

The long-time former World No.1 stayed impenetrable as the tilt reached its conclusion, knocking off a forehand winner to break Wang for a fifth and final time and hit 5-0, and firing one last winner off of that wing to convert her first match point and wrap up the quarterfinal victory.

Williams will now take on No.5 seed Elina Svitolina of Ukraine in a semifinal battle between the two highest-seeded players remaining in the draw, after Svitolina ousted Johanna Konta earlier on Tuesday. Williams leads their head-to-head 4-1, but Svitolina did win their most recent meeting, which was a shock upset at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro while Williams was World No.1.

"[Svitolina] is obviously a fighter," said Williams. "She gets a lot of balls back. She doesn't make a lot of mistakes. She's one of those players that does everything really well. So I have to do everything well, too."