All the key facts, head-to-heads and talking points as second-round action gets under way at Wimbledon 2019.
Alex Macpherson
July 2, 2019

LEARNING

No.7 seed Simona Halep's only previous meeting with compatriot Mihaela Buzarnescu was over a decade ago, in the first round of an ITF W25 event in Monteroni d'Arbia in 2008 when the pair were ranked World No.356 and World No.330 respectively. A 16-year-old Halep defeated a 20-year-old Buzarnescu 6-3, 6-0, before losing in the second round to Anna Floris.

Two big names face recent Russian conquerors today. No.8 seed Elina Svitolina lost to Tashkent champion Margarita Gasparyan 6-3, 3-6, 6-4 in the first round of Birmingham two weeks ago and No.14 seed Caroline Wozniacki was eliminated from Roland Garros in the first round 0-6, 6-3, 6-3 by fast-rising Veronika Kudermetova, who backed up her Paris performance by reaching her first WTA semifinal in 's-Hertogenbosch on grass three weeks ago.

A brand new Wimbledon finalist is guaranteed from the bottom half following Venus Williams's loss on Monday. Of the previous SW19 semifinalists left in this half of the draw, three - Victoria Azarenka, Simona Halep and Magdalena Rybarikova - are in the fourth quarter. Following Jelena Ostapenko's loss, the only player remaining in the third quarter to have reached the last four of The Championships before is Kirsten Flipkens.

No.3 seed Karolina Pliskova has never lost to Monica Puig in four matches stretching back to 2012, including a 6-2, 6-2 victory in their only prior grass encounter in the 2016 Nottingham semifinals. Puig has won just one set across their series - in their most recent meeting in the first round of Indian Wells 2017, which Pliskova eventually won 1-6, 6-4, 6-4.

Margarita Gasparyan - Birmingham 2019 - Jimmie48/WTA
Margarita Gasparyan after defeating Elina Svitolina in the first round of Birmingham 2019 (Jimmie48/WTA)

15-year-old Cori Gauff, who stunned Venus Williams in the first round on Monday, became the youngest player to win a Grand Slam main draw match since Anna Kournikova at the 1996 US Open and the youngest player to win a Wimbledon main draw match since Jennifer Capriati in 1991. The American teenager, who was given a wildcard into qualifying, notched up her first Top 100 win over Aliona Bolsova en route to the main draw; Williams was her first Top 50 victory. Gauff also became the youngest player the five-time champion has ever lost to (and only the second 15-year-old following Sesil Karatantcheva at Roland Garros 2005), and dealt out just the third opening-round loss at SW19 of Williams's career (following Magdalena Grzybowska in 1997 and Elena Vesnina in 2012).

2013 Wimbledon semifinalist Kirsten Flipkens leads No.28 seed Hsieh Su-Wei 2-1. Both of the Belgian's victories were straight-sets wins on US hard courts - in US Open qualifying in 2006 and in Cincinnati qualifying in 2017 - but Hsieh took their only previous grass meeting in a 5-7, 7-6(6), 7-5 thriller in Eastbourne qualifying in 2017.

Wimbledon had been the only major at which 2016 Australian Open quarterfinalist Zhang Shuai had not won a match before this year - but, having lost in the first round on all five prior appearances in SW19, the Chinese player broke her duck in style, upsetting Nottingham champion and No.23 seed Caroline Garcia 6-4, 6-0. Zhang is all square at 1-1 against her second-round opponent, qualifier and 2009 US Open semifinalist Yanina Wickmayer.

Six players have notched up their first Grand Slam main draw win at Wimbledon 2019: Marie Bouzkova, Harriet Dart, Varvara Flink, Cori Gauff, Ivana Jorovic and Kaja Juvan. Five teenagers have reached the second round: Gauff, Juvan, Amanda Anisimova, Anastasia Potapova and Dayana Yastremska.

TRENDING



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ORDER OF PLAY

For full order of play, visit wimbledon.com.

READING

Cori Gauff bursting on to the scene after a childhood spent idolising the Williams sisters shows that, particularly for marginalised groups, role models in the public eye still matter, writes Afua Hirsch in The Guardian.

No.4 seed Kiki Bertens never thought she could become a Top 10 player and still dislikes being the centre of attention - but this has been no barrier to success, finds Charlie Eccleshare in an interview with the Dutch player for The Telegraph.

Ever wondered how tennis magician Hsieh Su-Wei's idiosyncratic game style came to be? Ramadani Saputra has the answers in a feature for the Jakarta Post.

It hasn't been an easy journey, but Victoria Azarenka is beginning to rediscover the joy of tennis and how to balance it with motherhood, writes Reem Abulleil for wimbledon.com.