Holding The Trophy: Wimbledon

Just 16 women in the Open Era have held the Venus Rosewater Dish as Wimbledon champion.

Published July 03, 2009 11:51

Ann Jones was a popular home champion in 1969, defeating Billie Jean King in a three-set final. (Photo: Getty Images)
Ann Jones was a popular home champion in 1969, defeating Billie Jean King in a three-set final. (Photo: Getty Images)
Margaret Court was a three-time champion, in 1963, 1965 and in her Grand Slam year of 1970. (Photo: Getty Images)
Margaret Court was a three-time champion, in 1963, 1965 and in her Grand Slam year of 1970. (Photo: Getty Images)
Chris Evert reached 10 Wimbledon finals, winning titles in 1974, 1976 and 1981. (Photo: Getty Images)
Chris Evert reached 10 Wimbledon finals, winning titles in 1974, 1976 and 1981. (Photo: Getty Images)
Tour pioneer Billie Jean King won the last of her six titles in 1975. (Photo: Getty Images)
Tour pioneer Billie Jean King won the last of her six titles in 1975. (Photo: Getty Images)
In the tournament's centenary year, Virginia Wade thrilled her home crowd by winning the 1977 title. (Photo: Getty Images)
In the tournament's centenary year, Virginia Wade thrilled her home crowd by winning the 1977 title. (Photo: Getty Images)
Much-loved Australian Evonne Goolagong Cawley waited nine years to win her second title, in 1980 - the last mother to win a major singles title. (Photo: Getty Images)
Much-loved Australian Evonne Goolagong Cawley waited nine years to win her second title, in 1980 - the last mother to win a major singles title. (Photo: Getty Images)
Steffi Graf and Boris Becker scored a German sweep of the singles titles in 1989; this was the second of Graf's seven titles. (Photo: Getty Images)
Steffi Graf and Boris Becker scored a German sweep of the singles titles in 1989; this was the second of Graf's seven titles. (Photo: Getty Images)
The ninth time was the sweetest for Martina Navratilova, whose 1990 title broke the record for most singles crowns won. (Photo: Getty Images)
The ninth time was the sweetest for Martina Navratilova, whose 1990 title broke the record for most singles crowns won. (Photo: Getty Images)
The victory of clay-court queen Conchita Martinez in 1994 was a major surprise, and an even bigger cause for celebration for the Spaniard and her proud parents. (Photo: Getty Images)
The victory of clay-court queen Conchita Martinez in 1994 was a major surprise, and an even bigger cause for celebration for the Spaniard and her proud parents. (Photo: Getty Images)
Martina Hingis became the youngest Wimbledon singles champion in more than 100 years with her victory as a 16-year-old in 1997. (Photo: Getty Images)
Martina Hingis became the youngest Wimbledon singles champion in more than 100 years with her victory as a 16-year-old in 1997. (Photo: Getty Images)
After two heart-breaking finals losses, no victory was more popular than Jana Novotna's in 1998. (Photo: Getty Images)
After two heart-breaking finals losses, no victory was more popular than Jana Novotna's in 1998. (Photo: Getty Images)
Lindsay Davenport became the first American champion at Wimbledon in nine years with her 1999 triumph. (Photo: Getty Images)
Lindsay Davenport became the first American champion at Wimbledon in nine years with her 1999 triumph. (Photo: Getty Images)
Unbridled joy for Venus Williams in 2000, who claimed her first-ever Grand Slam singles title at the All-England Club in 2000. (Photo: Getty Images)
Unbridled joy for Venus Williams in 2000, who claimed her first-ever Grand Slam singles title at the All-England Club in 2000. (Photo: Getty Images)
It was an historic family affair in 2002, with Serena Williams defeating older sister (and part-time photographer) Venus in the 2002 final, the first all-sister Wimbledon final since 1884. (Photo: Getty Images)
It was an historic family affair in 2002, with Serena Williams defeating older sister (and part-time photographer) Venus in the 2002 final, the first all-sister Wimbledon final since 1884. (Photo: Getty Images)
Long touted as a future Grand Slam champion, Maria Sharapova surprised even herself by winning the 2004 crown as a 17-year-old. (Photo: Getty Images)
Long touted as a future Grand Slam champion, Maria Sharapova surprised even herself by winning the 2004 crown as a 17-year-old. (Photo: Getty Images)
For the second time in 2006, Amelie Mauresmo defeated Justine Henin to win a major singles title, the first Frenchwoman in 81 years to win the Wimbledon ladies' singles championship. (Photo: Getty Images)
For the second time in 2006, Amelie Mauresmo defeated Justine Henin to win a major singles title, the first Frenchwoman in 81 years to win the Wimbledon ladies' singles championship. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Ann Jones was a popular home champion in 1969, defeating Billie Jean King in a three-set final. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Margaret Court was a three-time champion, in 1963, 1965 and in her Grand Slam year of 1970. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Chris Evert reached 10 Wimbledon finals, winning titles in 1974, 1976 and 1981. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Tour pioneer Billie Jean King won the last of her six titles in 1975. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • In the tournament's centenary year, Virginia Wade thrilled her home crowd by winning the 1977 title. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Much-loved Australian Evonne Goolagong Cawley waited nine years to win her second title, in 1980 - the last mother to win a major singles title. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Steffi Graf and Boris Becker scored a German sweep of the singles titles in 1989; this was the second of Graf's seven titles. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • The ninth time was the sweetest for Martina Navratilova, whose 1990 title broke the record for most singles crowns won. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • The victory of clay-court queen Conchita Martinez in 1994 was a major surprise, and an even bigger cause for celebration for the Spaniard and her proud parents. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Martina Hingis became the youngest Wimbledon singles champion in more than 100 years with her victory as a 16-year-old in 1997. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • After two heart-breaking finals losses, no victory was more popular than Jana Novotna's in 1998. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Lindsay Davenport became the first American champion at Wimbledon in nine years with her 1999 triumph. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Unbridled joy for Venus Williams in 2000, who claimed her first-ever Grand Slam singles title at the All-England Club in 2000. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • It was an historic family affair in 2002, with Serena Williams defeating older sister (and part-time photographer) Venus in the 2002 final, the first all-sister Wimbledon final since 1884. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • Long touted as a future Grand Slam champion, Maria Sharapova surprised even herself by winning the 2004 crown as a 17-year-old. (Photo: Getty Images)
  • For the second time in 2006, Amelie Mauresmo defeated Justine Henin to win a major singles title, the first Frenchwoman in 81 years to win the Wimbledon ladies' singles championship. (Photo: Getty Images)
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